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Chill Out – Building Cooling and Conditioning

With improvements in air-tightness, insulation and the increasingly common presence of sealed windows, especially in multi-storey offices and accommodations, modern buildings are increasingly prone to overheating, driving the need for large scale and efficient air conditioning and cooling. At the heart of these HVAC systems will be a chilled water loop circulating through coils in the air handler units. There the chilled water, which is typically delivered into the piping system at between 5°C and 8°C, is used as a refrigerant to remove unwanted heat from the building.

Should the cooling system’s piping capacity be undersized, then the relatively low water volume causes the system to suffer from a range of problems such as compressors short cycling; poor temperature control and erratic system operation. All of which makes it harder to maintain comfortable conditions within the building. Chiller manufacturers, therefore, recommend between 11.5 to 23 litres of water per metric tonne (907 kg) for typical HVAC systems, climbing to between 23 and 40 litres per metric tonne for nominal cooling when temperature accuracy is critical.

By increasing the water ‘buffer’ capacity of a chiller system performance can be drastically improved. Chilled water tanks are therefore an essential component in modern-day conditioning systems, providing this increased capacity to ensure water temperature is stabilised within the parameters set by the chiller manufacturer for optimal operation.

Chilled Water Tanks (CWT) for building cooling and conditioning from Adveco.Adveco offers a versatile range of carbon steel Chilled Water Tanks (CWT) for commercial systems, featuring high and low-level tank connections that are suitable for moderate to high flow rates with a maximum working pressure of 6 bar. By expanding the total system volume and reducing the rate of temperature change in the return water by increasing thermal inertia through efficient insulation, temperature control is improved within a building’s cooling and conditioning system. And with better temperature control comes reduced condenser cycling and improved system start-up times, all of which helps to increase the chiller’s lifespan.

Should a system demand even greater accuracy of temperature control then higher storage volumes will be required. Adveco provides a choice of nine CWT vessels ranging in volumes from 500 to 5000 litres which offer a working temperature range of -10 to +60 C

Further information on the Adveco CWT range

Planning Change Ushers In Restaurant Refurbishment Challenge.

Planning Change Ushers In Restaurant Refurbishment Challenge

From the beginning of September 2020, changes to planning will see use classes A1 (shops), A2 (financial and professional services), A3 (restaurants) and B1 (offices) merged to create a new Class E. This will enable use of these spaces to be altered from one use to another or undergo change to multi-use venue without seeking consent from local authorities.

The simplification of planning creates several fascinating new opportunities. For pop-up and permanent restaurants, the opportunity is clear, especially for restaurant chains that have specialised in refurbishing existing High Street buildings. That said, the impact of COVID-19 on the restaurant sector cannot be discounted, so it remains to be seen how the demand for new restaurants in city centres will play out. There is strong evidence to suggest that ‘stay at home’ workers are now looking for more local venues to eat out, instead of opting for city centre locations which typically would have been a popular destination for commuting workers. This has the potential for rapid development of restaurants in more suburban locales where available properties have typically been former pubs. Pubs themselves remain exempt from these planning changes, and should a restaurant utilise one of these new spaces then it will require permission from local authorities to operate takeaways or to sell alcohol from the premises. Other locations could adopt a multi-use model, shifting from business space in the day to restaurant in the evening, or operating a full time mixed-business usage within a larger building.

These changes are seen as a key opportunity to revitalise the High Street, but the one thing we know well at Adveco is the potential complexity, and therefore hidden cost, of refurbishing a property when the site was not originally conceived as a restaurant. Landlords and new property owners need to recognise that heating and especially hot water are business critical functions, with suitable hot water storage needed to meet consistent and peak-hour demands. That water also must be supplied at a minimum of 60°C to ensure a hygienic cleaning of the environment, utensils and provide handwashing for both staff and customers.

Adveco has 50 years of experience delivering commercial heating and hot water refurbishment projects. We will size the needs of the premises, design a bespoke application, and supply the necessary system components, and ensure it is commissioned for use and serviced to manufacturer’s quality as part of the warranty.  You can discover more about our recent work refurbishing systems in listed buildings and our work for Five Guys revitalising building hot water systems throughout the UK. In all these cases, our customers are not only securing modern, highly efficient fit-for-purpose heating and hot water systems, they are also reducing their costs and either better controlling their carbon emissions or excising them with renewables for a more sustainable workplace.

Adveco packaged plant room for low carbon hot water.

Adveco Packaged e-Hot Water System For Low Carbon Hot Water

  • Reduce operational costs by offsetting up to 70% of the energy required by equivalent sized systems. Dramatically reduces CO² emissions
  • Unique low heat intensity specification reduces the threat of scale formation
  • Built-in backup for system resilience, ensuring consistency of service

Hot water and heating specialist Adveco, offers commercial businesses with large hot water demands but space limitations a complete, highly-efficient, low carbon response with its Packaged e-Hot Water System.

This prefabricated all-electric water heating system brings together Adveco’s FPi-9 Air Source Heat Pump (ASHP), an Adveco 200L GLC indirect preheat tank, and Adveco 200L GLE direct electric water heater to provide reliable high-temperature water in a convenient, packaged system housed in a compact GRP housing.

Bill Sinclair, technical director, Adveco says:

“The Packaged e-Hot Water System leverages all the advantages of off-site construction to provide a standardised, resilient, environmentally friendly, low carbon, hot water system that helps reduce both a building’s energy consumption and operational costs across its lifetime.”

Adveco’s Packaged E-Hot Water System makes particular use of the FPi-9 ASHP to provide the system preheat from 10°C to 50°C, supplying 70% of the DHW load.

Offsetting 70% of the energy requirement means the Packaged e-Hot Water System can demonstrate a 47% reduction in energy demands and CO² emissions for the same output of 500,000 litres of hot water each year when compared with a similar direct electric-only system. The reduced energy demand also means operational savings can be added to the capital savings secured during the design, supply, and installation phases.

A completely new specification that lowers the heat intensity, without detrimental effect to the demands for hot water, means the Packaged e-Hot Water System is also more resistant to scale, reducing maintenance demands.

The GLE also has an additional 6kW immersion heater to provide backup in case of failure of the lead heat source for sites where hot water is business critical. The Adveco designed control system monitors the heat sources, and in the case of failure, it can automatically activate the backup system.

Adveco’s Packaged e-Hot Water System is ideal for a wide range of commercial properties with regular hot water demands such as restaurants and boutique hotels, offices, schools, and light industry. The system is also perfect for both new builds or refurbishment where space is at a premium.

Adveco Packaged E-Hot Water System

Adveco Packaged E-Hot Water System for low carbon hot water.

Technical Features

  • FPi-9 ASHP supplies 9kW at 7°C outdoor temperature
  • Nominal 18kW of heat is input to the domestic hot water (9kW ASHP and 9kW electric element)
  • Sized to meet the typical needs of a larger facility and can supply 314 l/peak hour. Based on a 12-hour daily operation and one peak hour, this equates to 1370 litres of hot water per day
UK Government Makes New £350m Commitment to Decarbonisation.

UK Government Makes New £350m Commitment to Decarbonisation

  • Support targets construction, transport and heavy industry sectors
  • Includes dedicated funding for green hydrogen.

The Government has announced a £350 million package targeting carbon emissions from the construction, transport and heavy industry sectors in an effort to reach net-zero by 2050.

“Climate change is among the greatest challenges of our age. To tackle it we need to unleash innovation in businesses across the country,”

said Alok Sharma, business and energy secretary.

“This funding will reduce emissions, create green-collar jobs and fuel a strong, clean economic recovery – all essential to achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.”

The projects set to receive funding will work on developing new technologies that could help companies switch to more energy-efficient means of production, use data more effectively to tackle the impacts of climate change and help support the creation of new green jobs by driving innovation and growth in UK industries.

The investment comes after the Committee on Climate Changes 2020 Progress Report argued that for industry, electricity and hydrogen production and CCS should all be considered as pathways for decarbonisation, and a funding mechanism established for the chosen technologies before the end of 2020.

This latest investment doubles down on a commitment made last July of £170 million for deploying CCS and hydrogen networks within industrial clusters.

Of this latest round of funding, £139 million is to be dedicated to the cutting of emissions by supporting the transition from natural gas to clean hydrogen power and scaling up carbon capture and storage (CCS). The latter to place 90% of emissions currently being released into the air by heavy industry into permanent underground storage.

£26 million is to be directed at developing new, advanced building techniques – such as offsite construction – to reduce both construction costs and carbon emissions, with a further £10 million to support projects focused on productivity and building quality.

The announcement provides a much-needed indication of intent for the commercial sector which has, until now, complained of a lack of direction and support from the Government following its well-publicised aim to achieve net-zero by 2050. It is understandable that the government would target heavy industry and transport first as these are by far the guiltiest parties when it comes to carbon emissions, but increasingly, the finger has also pointed at the built environment. So the inclusion of dedicated support for construction is welcome.  However, the focus on ‘R&D’ projects and so by default, new builds, means many commercial organisations caught out by difficult or limiting refurbishment are still left waiting for clear advice and more crucially, for funding.

The real glimmer of hope in the announcement lies in the clear assertion that hydrogen production forms part of the Government’s plans for national carbon reduction. Familiarity and the most comprehensive pre-existing national infrastructure makes a transition from natural gas to a hydrogen mix an obvious choice for driving forward to net-zero. Critically, for many commercial organisations struggling to equate the costs of transitioning to more sustainable energy sources hydrogen offers a simple, and more cost-effective answer, so long as its provision is made more available in the mid-term. In the short-term, this should back a decision to move to hybrid systems that are able to blend legacy natural gas with direct-electric and renewable energy. What the government needs to do now is recognise the value of hybrid systems as a stepping stone to wholly hydrogen and renewable-based systems, thereby providing a safety net for commercial facility and energy managers who may fear expensive commitments to what could be the wrong energy technology in the long term.