Posts

Adveco’s Packaged e-Hot Water System Named Finalist in 2020 HVR Awards

  • Named finalist in the HVR 2020 Commercial Heating Product of the Year
  • Reduce operational costs by offsetting up to 70% of the energy required by equivalent sized systems. Dramatically reduces CO₂ emissions
  • Unique low heat intensity specification reduces the threat of scale formation

Adveco is proud to announce it has once again been named finalist in the Heating & Ventilation Review (HVR) Awards.  Named finalist in the 2020 Commercial Heating Product of the Year category, the Packaged e-Hot Water System from Adveco offers commercial businesses with large hot water demands but space limitations a complete, pre-sized highly-efficient, low carbon response.

The HVR Awards celebrate the products, brands, businesses and people that have led the way with their innovation and unrivalled levels of excellence, inducting them into the prestigious HVR Awards ‘Hall of Flame’.

“It is fantastic to see our Packaged e-Hot Water System be recognised in this way,” said David O’Sullivan, managing director, Adveco. “We are very proud of this product which brings together every aspect of our business, unifying our application design, product expertise and site services to provide a sustainable, future-proof product that is a robust, efficient and cost-effective way to secure hot water for a myriad of commercial applications.”

Adveco’s Packaged E-Hot Water System makes full use of the FPi-9 ASHP to provide the system preheat from 10°C to 50°C, supplying 70% of the DHW load. Offsetting 70% of the energy requirement means the Packaged e-Hot Water System can demonstrate a 47% reduction in energy demands and CO₂ emissions for the same output of 500,000 litres of hot water each year when compared with a similar direct electric-only system. The reduced energy demand also means operational savings can be added to the capital savings secured during the design, supply, and installation phases.

The system is also ground-breaking in the application of a completely new specification that lowers the heat intensity, without detrimental effect to the demands for hot water, meaning the Packaged e-Hot Water System is also more resistant to scale, reducing maintenance demands.

“The vision for, and execution to market of the Packaged e-Hot Water System has been a real team effort,” adds David. “Being named finalist once again in the HVR awards demonstrates the advantages of Adveco’s independent approach to innovation, ensuring customers have the very best system response to their need for low carbon, cost-effective applications as we all work to achieve net-zero.”

UK Government Makes New £350m Commitment to Decarbonisation

  • Support targets construction, transport and heavy industry sectors
  • Includes dedicated funding for green hydrogen.

The Government has announced a £350 million package targeting carbon emissions from the construction, transport and heavy industry sectors in an effort to reach net-zero by 2050.

“Climate change is among the greatest challenges of our age. To tackle it we need to unleash innovation in businesses across the country,”

said Alok Sharma, business and energy secretary.

“This funding will reduce emissions, create green-collar jobs and fuel a strong, clean economic recovery – all essential to achieving net-zero emissions by 2050.”

The projects set to receive funding will work on developing new technologies that could help companies switch to more energy-efficient means of production, use data more effectively to tackle the impacts of climate change and help support the creation of new green jobs by driving innovation and growth in UK industries.

The investment comes after the Committee on Climate Changes 2020 Progress Report argued that for industry, electricity and hydrogen production and CCS should all be considered as pathways for decarbonisation, and a funding mechanism established for the chosen technologies before the end of 2020.

This latest investment doubles down on a commitment made last July of £170 million for deploying CCS and hydrogen networks within industrial clusters.

Of this latest round of funding, £139 million is to be dedicated to the cutting of emissions by supporting the transition from natural gas to clean hydrogen power and scaling up carbon capture and storage (CCS). The latter to place 90% of emissions currently being released into the air by heavy industry into permanent underground storage.

£26 million is to be directed at developing new, advanced building techniques – such as offsite construction – to reduce both construction costs and carbon emissions, with a further £10 million to support projects focused on productivity and building quality.

The announcement provides a much-needed indication of intent for the commercial sector which has, until now, complained of a lack of direction and support from the Government following its well-publicised aim to achieve net-zero by 2050. It is understandable that the government would target heavy industry and transport first as these are by far the guiltiest parties when it comes to carbon emissions, but increasingly, the finger has also pointed at the built environment. So the inclusion of dedicated support for construction is welcome.  However, the focus on ‘R&D’ projects and so by default, new builds, means many commercial organisations caught out by difficult or limiting refurbishment are still left waiting for clear advice and more crucially, for funding.

The real glimmer of hope in the announcement lies in the clear assertion that hydrogen production forms part of the Government’s plans for national carbon reduction. Familiarity and the most comprehensive pre-existing national infrastructure makes a transition from natural gas to a hydrogen mix an obvious choice for driving forward to net-zero. Critically, for many commercial organisations struggling to equate the costs of transitioning to more sustainable energy sources hydrogen offers a simple, and more cost-effective answer, so long as its provision is made more available in the mid-term. In the short-term, this should back a decision to move to hybrid systems that are able to blend legacy natural gas with direct-electric and renewable energy. What the government needs to do now is recognise the value of hybrid systems as a stepping stone to wholly hydrogen and renewable-based systems, thereby providing a safety net for commercial facility and energy managers who may fear expensive commitments to what could be the wrong energy technology in the long term.